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20130118
20130118
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
to get our debt, the gdp, our deficit to gdp, down around 3%, which is the basis of which all economists left, right, center, agree, are the areas which we really can begin to grow as a country. and also my grandfather used to say, with the grace of god and good will of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling, that we may very well be able to meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over ten years, and in the long-term deficit and put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today because, as important as they all are, today we have a more urgent and immediate call, and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics very well so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i might add, oui an incredible debt of gratitude to many of you at the head table as well as those of you in the room. i know we don't have absolutely unanimity in this ballroom, nor do we in anyway ballroom, but we all know, everyone
began the fiscal year with $876.05 in the bank and a projected deficit of $500 million, even after taxes had been increased. i think a number of you remember that as well. working with the legislature, we ended last fiscal year with a $500 million ending balance, a billion dollar swing to the good and we paid off all of our callable bonds. good job, legislature. [applause] we are now in a strong fiscal position. the last decade was unfortunately a lost decade where kansas lost thousands of private sector jobs while the rest of america grew. in december 2010, our unemployment rate was 7%. today our state's unemployment rate is 5.4%, the 10th lowest in america, and wichita state university projects we will add more than 24,000 private sector jobs in the state this year alone. that's good news. [applause] when i started as governor, we had the highest state income tax in the region, now we have the 2nd lowest and i want us to take it to zero. look out texas, here comes kansas. [applause] in the previous decade, we had population losses of more than ten% in nearly half of our counties. today
. by creating jobs we reduce the deficit. >> jennifer: i'm take taking it as an encouraging sign that the tea party can be moved by public voices. if they can be moved on the debt ceiling of all things, maybe they could be moved on guns. you wrote in the "huffington post," advocating reducing defense spending so you can spend more money and invest in the united states. the question is in the negotiations in congress over the spending do you see that happening? >> we've got to make it happen. again, it's got to be the voice of the american people that will make it happen. people don't realize that 60% of our discretionary money go to the defense. wewe need and want a strong defense, with you but quite frankly out dateed cold war-era weapons can be taken off the table. there are many, many ways we can save money with defense in our pentagon budget, and never even touch anything that would affect our troops and their benefits and their families or national defense. nothing is off of the table and we have to under that defense can't be off of the table. we have to keep defense on the table as par
to borrow money to make up the deficit, but only up to a certain limit. that's the debt ceiling. treasury does not make decisions about how the money is spent. they are simply empowered in this case to write the checks to pay the bills that are already incurred by your democratically elected congress. the way you would if you are a little short on your monthly bills. refinancing a little bit. that will get us through maybe mid-february to early march. once that stops working, the treasury needs to rely on the cash that it has on hand and the revenue that comes in from taxes. problem is, there isn't that much cash on hand or enough money coming in on most days to cover the expenses. if there were, we wouldn't have a deficit. let me give you an example. february 15th. i choose that day because that might be the day. might be a little early but it might be the day that we stop being able to mess things around. okay. the federal government on that day will take in an estimated $9 billion in revenues. again, that is mostly taxes. on the same day, $52 million will need to be paid out. we've got
our debt to g.d.p., our deficit to g.d.p. down around 3%, which is the basis of all economists left, right and center all agree on the areas we can begin to grow as a country. and as my grandfather used to say with grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail now between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they all are today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have unanimity in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is
they need to put inshunes on a gun like you do a car. host: so often we focus on the u.s. debt or deficit, we have exceeded now the dealt limit of $16.4 trillion. you can see in the upper left-hand side the debt clock. difficult choices on the debt if the u.s. think it's ceiling. the piece points out by mid february or early march the united states could face an unprecedented default unless it raises the debt ceiling. that was from tim geithner. further into the body of the "new york times" story i want to is share with you some of the numbers "the new york times" points out today. that could happen as early as february 15, if that happens by february 15 or early march, according to the by partisan policy center in analysis of what the government expects is $8 billion in revenue that day but it has $52 billion in spending that day, $6.8 billion in tax refunds, $3.5 in federal salaries, and $1.5 ode to military contractors and other commitments. consider again that day on february 15 f that is the day we reach the limit, the country would not have enough money to pay the bond holders let a
remains committed to further reducing the deficit in a balanced way. so that is the response from the white house after the gop at its retreat in virginia came out with the possibility that perhaps we could extend the debt limit for another three months but the senate has to pass a budget, so the republicans which it has not done in four years. so. tracy: no surprise from the white us house. ashley: says no. tracy: okay, then. how about this. hank paulson says he hates the debt limit. you remember the former treasury secretary, the guy who said i need $700 billion right now? no wonder he hates it. ashley: don't we all. tracy: he has given a rare interview. we have details on that next. ashley: first a look at today's winners and losers. the dow just above the water mark. take a look. we'll be right back. ♪ chances are you've become, a better driver over the years. and one company thinks your auto insurance rates should get better too. presenting the aarp auto insurance program from the hartford. i'm a good driver. have been for years. it just makes sense that better, more experi
and republicans. out of that, hopefully, some progress being made to get this deficit and debt under control. we believe our obligation is to help prevent a debt crisis from hitting this country. republicans have had a tough spot here. the president of united states as he is not negotiating the debt ceiling. he says it is simply up to congress. it is due to spending that is already approved. the majority of republicans voted against the deal because there were no spending cuts. this was the first strategy session. we are going to have these fights throughout the spring. back to you. cheryl: we just had a guest trying to tell us to avoid the noise in washington. thank you very much, rich. dennis: let's take a look at apple shares right now. down five dollars. 1%. another tip today. an analyst says do not hang up on the iphone maker. that cancellation of orders for iphone parts, it is not tied to sell drop in demand for iphone5. apple is moving toward so-called -- screens from different suppliers. analyst who are usually critical of apple came out and said, look, this recent sellout, way overdone.
the american economy. >> steve: here is somebody who dealt with enormous deficits firsthand, the former governor of the golden state of california, arnold schwarzenegger. good morning to you. >> good morning. nice to be here again. >> brian: he sends a warning to the republicans should they back off or take on the president? >> first of all, i think i find it interesting that when you want to have more money, if you go to any financial institution, they say look, i can't pay my bills, i need more money. they want to see their payment plan. how are you going to live responsible from here on? then you can get more money. so i don't understand that why this should not be a part of the discussion because it ought to be. i think america should not just blindly go in there and keep spending money that we don't have. every single day we're spending more and more money. every year it's like $1.3 trillion more than we have and then it gets added to the debt and that's why this short period of time we have seen the debt go up. >> steve: we have a live picture of the debt now. all right, governor.
veer -- inadvertently did not disclose information, you are put at a credibility deficit with the public, and sometimes it is hard to dig out of that. it is very difficult for organizations, especially in a crisis response, to think about just releasing the information before it's asked for and remove that deficit. i've been involved in several situations where the information was available and the information was understandable and probably mitigated some of the concerns, but because of the way the companies in the government work, it was difficult to make that transparent and then catching up with that with the american public is really, really difficult. nancy and marcia, we had talked about this with jay a lot. one of the problems we have in mental anguishing impacts -- measuring the impacts of the spill in the gulf is the lack of the background of the presence of hydrocarbons as a baseline for understanding there had been a change. in the context of moving beyond the direct aims of the research that's going to be conducted with the bp money, what do you think the lar
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)